Spotlight | The Daily Star
  • Not seen, not heard, not believed

    Over the last month Star Weekend surveyed and interviewed 300 people to find the answer to this question: why do child sexual abuse cases not get reported, and what can be done to rectify it? The respondents included social workers who deal with these cases, lawyers, eye-witnesses and 195 child sexual assault survivors themselves.

  • Death camps for wildlife

    Juboraj, the 19-year-old ailing lion is awaiting death in a cage at Comilla Zoo. His skeletal body and the rotting wounds on his back are stark signs of the extreme negligence that put him in this fatal state.

  • 5 years since Tazreen: delayed compensation and deferred justice

    It has been five years since Reba leaped out of the third floor of the Tazreen garments factory and fractured both her legs. It's been half-a-decade since a rod pierced through Akash's eyebrow, after he smashed a window in an attempt to escape the burning floor. It has also been five years since either of them have had a good night's sleep.

  • militant money maker

    The militant money maker

    The man takes different names but introduces himself as an automobile trader to all. He lures people into buying vehicles at prices far lower than the market rate, citing special connections with the custom officials at Chittagong Port.

  • The spectre of Red October: 100 years of the Russian Revolution

    The 1917 October Revolution was a watershed moment in history. Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels set the philosophical vision for the scientific theory of revolution, and even actively fought for it, but it was Vladimir Lenin under whose stewardship it became a reality.

  • The abandoned mothers

    Thirteen-year-old Rupa Akter begs on a foot over-bridge in the capital's Shewrapara area, with her eight-month-old son, Nirob. Akter lives in a makeshift house (if one can call the threadbare tarp tent a house) under the bridge—her unemployed husband left her and married another woman during her pregnancy.

  • Is BTV obsolete?

    BTV, at best, is a nostalgic reminder of the past—of the powerful, yet entertaining serials and dramas of the 70s and 80s—when it was the sole broadcaster of the country.

  • Prison babies: childhood behind bars

    What is it like spending the formative early years in one of the most overcrowded prison systems in the world? What protections are there in place to ensure they develop like any other child?

  • Living the genocide: in the grip of trauma

    With no psychosocial assistance, Rohingya refugees are vulnerable to life-long PTSD.

  • Swallowed by the river

    A flood is a familiar drill for Anwar Hossain. He can't keep track of how many times he has dismantled and moved his house. Of the millions who live on the riverine islands, or chars, in the Jamuna, no one lives in one place for more than a few years.

  • Why your drugs don't work

    There are drugs that come as tablets or capsules and can be kept at room temperature. Then there are drugs that patients will not usually handle—reagents used by diagnostic centres to conduct tests or intravenous drugs administered by medical professionals.

  • Yearning for relief

    August 26, 2017. The morning started like any other at Shikderpara village in Maungdaw town. He was preparing to visit his paddy fields where around 400 maunds of rice were almost ready to be harvested next month.

  • How flows become floods

    Failure of flood embankments and absence of alternative solutions are leading Bangladesh to a watery grave.

  • An ominous trend

    Statistics related to floods and cyclones display a dramatic increase in intensity in the last three decades in Bangladesh and experts fear that the trend is likely to get worse.

  • This time Dhaleshwari

    Leather factories polluting again

  • Science is out

    The number of students pursuing science is decreasing at an alarming rate

  • Is 'politics' a dirty word?

    With no democratic student governments in private universities, what recourse do students really have?

  • Not your regular 9-to-5 job

    With greater independence in work and better pay, many Bangladeshi workers are turning to freelancing in the online marketplace.

  • Humans for sale

    Human trafficking in Bangladesh has taken a turn for the worse

  • What about justice for the unheard?

    It is a long and difficult struggle for persons with intellectual, hearing and speech disabilities

  • A demographic time bomb?

    According to the latest figures released by the Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics (BBS), around two million youths of working age are unemployed. Young university graduates are struggling the most to secure employment.

  • Finding the superbug, the invincible bacteria

    Scientists find invincible bacteria resistant to all antibiotics in city locations

  • Nobody to blame for the landslides

    As the landslides wreaked havoc over Chittagong division in the last two weeks, there was one thing that everyone was at a consensus about – this was a man-made disaster.

  • Live from a ghost town

    Landslides in Rangamati is a wake-up call for the country.

  • Digital repression in Digital Bangladesh

    The number of cases filed under section 57 of the ICT Act seems to be on the rise. This year has already seen more than 260 cases.

  • Longadu burning

    The indigenous people of Longadu flee to remote jungles escaping violent rioting.

  • Rampal Power Plant: Myths debunked

    The critics of Rampal include environmentalists, scientists and experts. Yet, the defence for the power plant has remained the same. But, under scrutiny, how do these claims, meant to relieve us of our fears about the potential risks of the power plant, hold?

  • No room for the forgotten

    In April, a tender appeared on the Dhaka South City Corporation (DSCC) website inviting constructors to propose a price to build two sets of three six-storied residential buildings at Ganaktuli City Colony, Hazaribagh.

  • An Island Unto Itself

    More than 1.4 million* students of Bangladesh study in an education system that has historically kept itself isolated from the rest of the world.

  • Lost to corruption

    The people set afloat by the flash floods of the haor areas are not blaming their luck—or some supreme being. The only omnipotent force they are naming is far nearer, in the Sylhet metropolis and goes by the name of the Water Development Board.

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